An IT Rental Perspective of the French Disdain for Social Networking

France has dealt one big blow to social media strategists at broadcast companies, banning all mentions of sites like Facebook and Twitter on TV and radio broadcasts.

The BBC wrote that the nation’s broadcasting watchdog has deemed such plugs as that which breaks “guidelines on advertising.”

Stations can still make mention of the sites generically, but can not make any specific mention of their names. How they will do this, no one knows. Even the BBC wrote, “It is unclear how they would be able to direct people to such sites without identifying them.”

Social networking has been a huge part of broadcasting companies’ efforts to interact with viewers, and while it can promote the companies, as social networking efforts often do, the discussion can also allow for further content generation of news coverage. France, however, sees that promotion as a bit too secretive and in violation of previous legislation banding “covert advertising.”

The ruling that was published online stated: “Referring viewers or listeners to the page of the social network without mentioning it has the character of information. Whereas the referral by naming the social network in question has the character of advertising, contrary to the provision of Article 9 of the decree of 27 March 1992 forbidding advertising.”

France has been criticised in the past by some who feel the government regulation on technology, particularly as it comes to the Internet is “stifling innovation.”

This is a tough break for French broadcasting companies, as here at Hamilton Rentals we have a healthy social networking system in place to stay in contact with our customers who are also businesses that engage in the practice—often syncing multiple devices available in our lineup of IT equipment for hire. Whether they need five projectors for an AV rental or 200 Macbook Airs for laptop hire, we’ve got them covered.

Our customers contact us through an array of outlets including Linkedin, our company Facebook Page, and even Twitter.

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